Did you expect me to cook again today? I didn’t. But here I am.

There was a bike race going on underneath my balcony today. It started around one and went until five.

Kind of odd, considering I live on a quiet street in a very quiet urban town. It’s just not the type of thing you’d expect to see after lunch.

Last month the first strawberries appeared and I celebrated. This month the first cherries appeared, and as soon as I saw them at the market, my mouth started to water.

My first thought was: I really need to buy some.

My second thought was: Chocolate Covered Cherries

I finally bought a handful today. Most were eaten as dessert, but then I remembered I had chocolate in the house. And I also had rum.

Ok, so a cherry liquor would have worked better, but I worked with what I had.

Honestly, I didn’t know if this would take. I mean, how exactly does one make chocolate-covered liquored fruit?

First wash your cherries. (Did you hear about the contaminated Spanish cucumber scare? Wash your cucumbers!) Put them in a small bowl and cover them with liquor. Let sit.

Bowl water in a large saucepan, with a bain-marie on top. Once the water is boiling add chocolate and a little bit of milk.

This is the most delicate part, I think. I’ve worked with chocolate a lot and it’s a finicky sweet thing when melted. I found that adding milk to the melted chocolate keeps the chocolate or the sugar in the chocolate from cooking and caramelizing – if that’s true or not I don’t know, but it seems to work for me.

It also seems to require patience. I wait until the chocolate looks completely melted before I mix the milk in to form a paste and then I usually add more milk – just to make sure. I mix lightly, slowly. The spoon doesn’t whip around the bain-marie, but mostly spreads the chocolate around and I let the milk do its thing on its own.

Then take the cherries that have been soaking in the liquor and dip them into the bain-marie, coating them with the chocolate.

Make sure you steer clear of the steam from the water! I burned my wrists a few times.

Put the cherries on a baking sheet and let cool.

I wasn’t sure if the rum would actually stick to the cherries. Honestly, they’d only been soaking for maybe 15 minutes, but the end result was a very light rum taste that off-set the sweetness of the chocolate and acid-berry of the cherry.

Ideally, if I’d had any forethought I would have let the cherries sit in the rum for an hour or two. But I’ll try that next time – maybe after I return from the market tomorrow.

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