About four months ago I mentioned how the women of my family have a serious addiction to ice cream. Ben and Jerry’s, Haagen Dazs, Breyers, Laitiere, it didn’t matter what. Though the first has always held a special, special place in our hearts. I’ve even visited the Ben and Jerry’s factory. Twice.

So now, I bring you:

Je Mange Toute la France Ice Cream Brand.

Though I may have to scale that name down a bit.

It appears the husband, and oddly enough the cat, have caught my ice cream disease and when the two of them were discussing what to get me for the holidays, the husband suggested an ice cream maker.

“Pistou, do you think Holly would like an ice cream maker?” the husband asked.

“Meow miaw” Pistou said in his garbled version of cat franglais.

“But don’t you think she’ll be offended by me getting her another kitchen appliance? I thought women didn’t like that,” the husband worried.

Miaw meow!” Pistou got up from the couch and trotted to the bathroom.

The husband sat on the couch alone, thinking. A plaintive cry of “Miaw meow miaw!” echoed from the bathroom and he took that as a sign from Pistou to stop thinking and do.

And that’s how I got my ice cream maker. (See the wine in the background? I was celebrating with a glass of Gewürztraminer from Alsace.)

Since that day I have made three types of ice creams. Not bad considering it takes a good twelve hours, if not twenty-four. It took a bit of time to get the ingredients down, the recipe, the cooking, the add-ins. But I’ve done it. Third time is the charm and I’ve mastered the ice cream.

Today’s goût du jour is Speculoos, which is actually a cookie, but it makes a good ice cream too. Idea taken from Haagen Dazs.

  • 250 ml of whole milk
  • 250 ml heavy whipping cream or crème de fleurette de Normandy
  • 100 grams of granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • vanilla extract

It all starts there.

Heat up the milk in a pan, being careful not to boil it. Meanwhile into a larger pan whisk together the eggs and sugar until you get a homogenous mixture and the sugar is semi-dissolved. Once the milk is hot, pour it slowly into the egg/sugar mixture, whisking all the while. Don’t let the eggs have time to sit. Transfer the mixture to medium heat and add the heavy cream. Whisk whisk whisk. It’s not as bad as caramel or fudge where you can’t stop for a second, but don’t stop for more than 30 because you don’t want the eggs to cook. Keep heating the mixture for about 10 minutes or until it looks to be a custard that will coat the back of the spoon. I cooked this mixture just until the point of the eggs cooking – as you can see by the slight lumps and it came out fine, but catch it immediately if this happens.

Cool for 12 hours (no less) in the fridge.

On happy ice cream day, put together your ice cream maker. Smile to yourself in anticipation. Tell the husband to watch the ravioli cooking on the stove because you’re otherwise occupied.

Take your blend out of the fridge. It should be a thick custard. Don’t worry about the lumps, as long as there is no taste of scrambled egg, you’re fine.

Pour it into the ice cream maker and turn on. Add your fixings. I added crushed and broken speculoos cookies.

But then I went ahead and added speculoos spread too. It’s like peanut butter or nutella, but it tastes like the cookie. It’s sinful.

Let your ice cream turn and turn and turn and turn. For about 40 minutes.

And there you are. The speculoos spread some how wrapped itself around the cookie chunks in mixing. Every time we get a cookie there’s a surprising softness of the spread right around it. A pleasant little texture and taste treat for the mouth. Fresh, homemade, fabulously smooth, absolutely sinful speculoos ice cream. It’s just that easy.

Enjoy!

According to WordPress, this is my 50th post. Is there a better way to celebrate than ice cream?

I don’t think so.

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